U.S. Air Force Hampered by Budget Cuts

Pat Bliss
Mark Foster
Ed Davis
Naomi Hassler
Donna Willey
Jean Summers
Marilyn Kinsell
Mary Thom
Serena Kovalik
Herbert Staretz
Anthony Mcnair
Mary Bachmann walker
Brenda Hobbs
Richard Van fleet
Tim Schofield
Robert French
Yesyesyes Yyyy
Mehrdad Dastouri
Jeremy Wright
Joan Fowler
Dale Flyberg
Doreen Malecha
Rob and martha Langford
Francine Anton
Robert g Hedenberg jr
Werner Mc christy
Joyce Green
Joe Billion
Michael Dalton
Donald York

The U.S. Air Force is fixing anti-ISIS planes by using parts from museums and scrapyards, according to a report from Fox News

Budget cuts and a lack of necessary parts have forced mechanics to scrounge for parts from sites such as the aircraft boneyard in Arizona and even take pieces from retired, decades-old planes displayed in museums.

 

Fighter jets and bombers from various branches of the U.S. military are a vital part of the U.S.-led anti-ISIS Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq and Syria. The U.S. and coalition aircraft have conducted nearly 13,000 airstrikes in Iraq and Syria since the campaign began in June 2015. Aircraft will go after enemies and protect friendly forces on the ground as the campaign against ISIS continues.

 

It is essential that U.S. aircraft undergo proper maintenance in order to protect national security, maintain the safety of our U.S. military personnel, and defeat ISIS. U.S. Air Force Captain Travis Lytton, a member of the 28th Maintenance Squadron at Ellsworth Air Force Base in South Dakota, says his crew was forced to use landing gear components from a museum aircraft because there were no pieces left in the supply system. Fox News reports that only nine of twenty B-1 bombers at Ellsworth can fly because of a lack of parts.

 

Proper training and personnel readiness are also vitally important to the success of military operations. Fox reports that crews, pilots, and even planes are exhausted and overextended from successive deployments overseas. Pilots are sometimes forced to do administrative work because civilian administrative workers were fired due to budget cuts. Pilots and crews cannot train when the airplanes are broken and when military personnel have to fill in for jobs that they should not have to do.

 

It is unacceptable that the U.S. Air Force must use scraps and museum parts to fix planes which are the backbone of U.S national security and the fight against terrorists. U.S. pilots and crews should have the opportunity to train and rest while not deployed rather than do someone else’s job. Secure America Now urges you to support the U.S. military and protect our national security in any way you can, especially at the voting booth this November!